1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

OcUK Dadsnet thread

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Devrij, Jul 30, 2016.

  1. Liquid_Entity

    Soldato

    Joined: Apr 11, 2006

    Posts: 5,564

    Location: East Grinstead, W Sussex

    We didn't have terrible 2s with our boy. We now have troublesome 3s. Much more vocal much more refusals. Getting him in bath is a chore and then getting him out is even worst. Brushing teeth also a nightmare. Tried all the tricks like pretending he does mine etc. 'don't want to' is all I hear back.
     
  2. xyphic

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 11, 2003

    Posts: 1,683

    Location: South Yorkshire

    It can be worrying when they don't hit their milestones at the prescribed times. Our youngest has just turned 16 months and is toddling around nicely (probably slightly ahead in that regard) but isn't talking yet. Apparently he should have over 5 words by now. He's communicating - he waves his hands frantically for no - and babbling but doesn't seem interested in talking just yet. The only reason I get slightly concerned is that our eldest is autistic and had a severe speech delay. Pretty sure youngest isn't on the spectrum though; he doesn't have any of the red flags.

    So many things to worry about as a parent!
     
  3. dl8860

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 25, 2010

    Posts: 2,580

    Location: Surrey

    Our boy is just over 8 months old. He was fed on mixture of breast milk and formula due to wife not being able to produce that much milk and he was always fussy at the boob. Since 5 months he's been eating solid food, wouldn't take the boob any more but continued drinking formula. Problem is the formula is blooming expensive, and in my mind it's time we start to taper him off.

    All the advise is to not give cows milk until they are 12 months, but this isn't because there's anything bad in it, it's because it isn't nutritionally complete like formula. My wondering is that if he has 4 bottles of formula (4*250ml) a day, and 3 square meals a day, he's basically overkilling on nutrients, and we could replace at least 2 formula bottles with cows milk.

    His meals are something like this:

    Breakfast: 1x Weetabix
    Lunch: 2 green beans, 1 melty puff, 1 piece baby sweetcorn, blended cooked veg (mushrooms, peppers, tomatoes) with cous cous, 1 sliced nectarine, 1 small yoghurt
    Supper: 2 florets broccoli, 1 melty puff some baked beans with a bit of mash potato and cheese, 1/2 mashed banana.

    Wife is concerned he might miss out on some nutrients he needs but I can't stop thinking he's just peeing out lots of expensive excess nutrition, a bit like adults taking excess multivitamins - no problem with it but unnecessarily expensive.

    If you google it you get the usual spectrum from "I heard my neighbours 10 month old developed stomach ulcers after having cows milk" to "my grandad was raised on a diet of raw cows milk and rocks and lived to 103".
     
  4. robj20

    Soldato

    Joined: Apr 9, 2007

    Posts: 7,104

    Location: Manchester

    4*250ml, that sounds loads. George never goes above about 180ml and has about 2 a day, plus a couple of yoghurts with rice mixed in.
    On the plus side at least the formula is on prescription so free.
     
  5. dl8860

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 25, 2010

    Posts: 2,580

    Location: Surrey

    He's a hungry chap, think he's about 60th percentile for weight. It's not always 4, number wife said last night was between 2 and maybe even 5 on a day where he's fussy with food but somehow hungry at the same time.
     
  6. Devrij

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 23, 2009

    Posts: 12,943

    Location: Bath

    I found a good trick for getting out of the bath. I ask her if she wants me to splash her with cold water. I did it once (not loads, just a wee spray from the tap), and now I just have to reach for the tap and she springs up and is ready to go. Getting in, on the other hand, is still hit and miss. Generally positive reinforcement (a game or something) works best for me. She just hates washing her hair because she won't look up and close her eyes to wash the shampoo out.
     
  7. skaif

    Mobster

    Joined: Oct 25, 2014

    Posts: 2,600

    Location: Home

    Do you guys take your lil ones swimming? We have zero issues with bath time as I have been taking her swimming since around 9 months and she is into a really good routine now!
    She immediately loved the water and giving her baths (showers in the changing rooms) has become normal for her.
    We had an issue with shampoo getting in her eyes but letting her hold the head and do it herself has helped.
    We don't have a bath at home - just walk in showers and she can happily be left in there for half an hour playing with her 'bath' toys.
     
  8. LewisRaz

    Wise Guy

    Joined: May 23, 2016

    Posts: 1,548

    Location: North Essex

    We started swimming lessons at about 3 months which started off well but got progressively worse as she got towards a separation anxiety phase at about 7 months.

    Now she is over that she was straight back in he water and loves it more than ever.
     
  9. dl8860

    Mobster

    Joined: Jul 25, 2010

    Posts: 2,580

    Location: Surrey

    Our 8 month old loves swimming and baths, can't get enough. Hope it lasts!
     
  10. katinacooker

    Gangster

    Joined: Aug 20, 2013

    Posts: 449

    Location: Glasgow

    I like this thread more than the other one
     
  11. robj20

    Soldato

    Joined: Apr 9, 2007

    Posts: 7,104

    Location: Manchester

    If anyone is interested there was a program on the BBC called Hospital series 4 episode 4, a lot about my son's cardiac surgeon Ramana and specifically one of the operations he had ECMO. Some really good bits about his dedication to his job and how his family understand him being away from them for so long.

    Hope some of you watch it.


    Episode one covered his neuro surgeon Conor Mallucci.
     
  12. Devrij

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 23, 2009

    Posts: 12,943

    Location: Bath

    That's pretty rad that they're giving some recognition to these people who do frankly ridiculously complex operations. Especially when they make such an incredible difference to people's lives
     
  13. robj20

    Soldato

    Joined: Apr 9, 2007

    Posts: 7,104

    Location: Manchester

    He's a different breed, he's a friend on Facebook and always asks how he's doing. One of his big achievements he says.
     
  14. itchy

    Mobster

    Joined: Mar 29, 2011

    Posts: 4,746

    What I have found is when you bring perfection to the table, you miss disappointment.

    My daughter is a pain wins everything in dance and top of the shop at school.

    I said to her can you not fail at something? She said no dad because I hate losing at anything.

    Wish I had that tenacity when I was her age. She only 12 and goes like the clappers on a computer or phone she makes her mum look like retard when it comes to technology.

    I will try to keep up but the little **** is moving faster than me. :p
     
  15. skaif

    Mobster

    Joined: Oct 25, 2014

    Posts: 2,600

    Location: Home

    I wouldn't worry too much, there will always be a kid out there who is better / faster / more able. But that's shouldn't stop them from trying to be the best.
    Also be wary that disappointment can take many forms. I. E. You might think that getting a 8 in GCSEs is a great achievement but if you have a high flier the disappointment in not getting a 9 will be huge. It's dealing with that emotion when they're older that can be an issue. Important to be supportive when it does happen so they don't get into a downward spiral.
    Seen it many times unfortunately!
     
  16. itchy

    Mobster

    Joined: Mar 29, 2011

    Posts: 4,746

    My daughter sees that she goes ballistic for some reason and is like a nut job until she matches or beats them. She is a very pleasant kid but a little narcissistic and very clever.

    Cart wheels on concrete without touching the floor, when she went to her new school only kid in her year to get straight into the elite dance team.

    Its nuts parents evening lasts about 3 minutes everything is green on the chart, she can out do me at maths, comprehension, English the full script. Only leg up I have is science and computers but I know I will lose that one day.

    Kids learn very, very fast.
     
  17. RoboCod

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jun 19, 2004

    Posts: 16,560

    Location: On the Amiga500

    The boy is now a shade over 3 months old and getting him to stay asleep is proving a challenge. He will doze off in our arms and as soon as we lay him down, BANG! turbo melt down. It's like he has a built in altimeter. It's tough, and it seems the general concensus is "enjoy this time" ...if one.more person says that to me though, I might poke their eyes out :D difficult to enjoy screaming at 3am.
     
  18. Raumarik

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jul 14, 2003

    Posts: 13,590

    We were fairly tough with our daughter, putting her in the cot then leaving and only going in after 5 minutes etc. Extending that period each time.

    Didn't work for a friends kid though. They are all different! We were very lucky, our daughter never tried to get out of her cot etc!
     
  19. Dup

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Mar 10, 2006

    Posts: 9,794

    Location: East Lancs

    My 4 month old has a bath about 8-8.30pm and a feed straight after and he's sleeping through the odd night, but if he does wake it's about 1 or 2am where we just give him a feed and he goes back off to sleep. We keep light low and to a minimum when he's supposed to be asleep etc and it seems to work.
     
  20. katinacooker

    Gangster

    Joined: Aug 20, 2013

    Posts: 449

    Location: Glasgow

    ours is almost 8 months and is waking up every few hours. Looking forward to when this is over