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Snow Sports Thread 2018-19

Discussion in 'Sports Arena' started by Jokester, Jul 21, 2018.

  1. Somnambulist

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jun 17, 2010

    Posts: 9,303

    Location: London

    They came in the post yesterday. I'm a gym rat so have a rather annoying waist to hip/thigh ratio, but with the velcro adjusters on the waist they're not slipping down me too badly. They're a bit long as I'm a 30 leg but I guess that doesn't matter given how big the boots are.

    I got a couple of 100% merino socks as well as two 100% merino base layers, with the plan being to alternate between them and hopefully they'll live up to the 'won't whiff' hype. Just need gloves (and travel insurance) and I'm more or less done: they're the one thing I need to really try a bunch on at the same time to see what fits best so haven't ordered them online.
     
  2. Jokester

    Don

    Joined: Aug 7, 2003

    Posts: 37,856

    Location: Aberdeenshire

    You can wear merino wool for days on end without it smelling, I tend to wear mine for a couple of days and then change, but I worn some upto 5 days without it smelling.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2018
  3. DereksDontRun

    Hitman

    Joined: Oct 23, 2013

    Posts: 657

    If you're learning, I'd try to stay away from the backpack - it can mess with balance and make things more difficult. Sure, it's nice to have some food/drink with you, but honestly it makes it more difficult when getting the basics.

    As for back protector - tbh, I wouldn't worry (but, equally, I'd never want to advertise not wearing safety gear). But, if you're snowboarding then I'd HIGHLY recommend impact shorts (like padded cycling shorts) and can help your coccyx in any fall (and provide some insulation when sat around). Also wrist guards and certainly a helmet...
     
  4. Somnambulist

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jun 17, 2010

    Posts: 9,303

    Location: London

    I got a tiny backpack, it's just big enough to stow away a mid-layer in if I get too warm and a small bottle of water so I don't see that it'll do much to mess with my balance. I should note that when I was younger I roller bladed quite a bit, and although skiing is obviously different in many respects I'm assuming the balance/weight distribution is similar. My balance and body awareness is pretty good generally from all the yoga I do too. The back protection was more because I read one big cause of injury is being taken out from behind by other people, but then if I'm on the nursery slopes and the easy ones later in the week I imagine people won't be blitzing downhill.

    I got impact shorts - they're the Demon ones with D30 in the coccyx. They make wearing the ski pants a bit more restrictive but not to the point of being unwearable. I think they'll come in handy even if I ski since they have padding on the hips and that seems a common impact point when you go over skiing.

    Going to rent the helmet, ski/snowboard boots and the skis/board themselves - I think I've spent enough this first time round!

    I do still need gloves and goggles though but I think I'm good for everything else.
     
  5. Syla5

    Mobster

    Joined: Feb 13, 2012

    Posts: 4,790

    You will be absolutely fine with a backpack, I use one with a drink pouch in, small and just for a snack, drinks pouch and walkie talkie in it. Never had an issue.
     
  6. Bony Maloney

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 9,772

    Location: Glyn Ceiriog

    Just booked Saalbach for our group of 5, 1st week in March. 3rd visit in the last 3 seasons for us. We like :D:cool:
     
  7. Somnambulist

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jun 17, 2010

    Posts: 9,303

    Location: London

    I got the most Merino wool-rich socks from Decathlon, along with a 100% merino base layer (Quechua) from there and one off Amazon (brand was Lapasa) as well that was good value for money, they both fit well and didn't itch when I wore them, so the plan is wear them alternate days, so for the skiing I shouldn't have to pack too much compared to the casual evening wear.

    Goggles sorted so just need gloves - I think at this point I'm set on skiing and it's not going to be mentally cold so I suppose I want something water/windproof, good for around freezing but dexterous/grippy for the poles...

    Oh and travel insurance. Really need that!
     
  8. DereksDontRun

    Hitman

    Joined: Oct 23, 2013

    Posts: 657

    Decathlon thermals and socks are fine, used them for years - but usually have to buy more each season.

    gloves - crazy as it sounds, but looks for some leather, lined gardening gloves (usually tan coloured). WAY cheaper than "official" snow gloves and just as good - and you'll fit in with local instructors...

    Personally, I like mits, so have a pair of http://shop.snowshepherd.co.uk/Ski-Gloves mits that are great. They used to have a 10% off code with "SHOW" or "SHOW10" - dunno if it still works, but give it a go ;)

    Travel insurance - check your bank, if you have insurance with the bank. yes, they're not great snow policies, but for beginner slopes, and rental gear, they should be fine. Personally, I've used InsureAndGo for the last 4 or 5 years, as they cover both park and off-piste, so I'm ok. Before that Dogtag and others, but they all seemed to add more and more restrictions to off-piste and park use. Sure, you only know how good the companies are when they come to a claim, but at least I feel I have something... If you're heading to Europe, make sure to get an EHIC card for your wallet, just in case... (I know seasonairs in France that don't have travel insurance and just rely on EHIC and possibly a carte neige)
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2018
  9. Somnambulist

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jun 17, 2010

    Posts: 9,303

    Location: London

    Thanks! I'll see if I can find some that fit that description. I've seen people talk about mountain bike gloves like that too as they're usually a bit cheaper than ski ones. It's not going to be -20 or anything so the great big gloves and mittens are probably way OTT anyway. Also thanks for the travel insurance stuff, that's useful. I do have a EHIC!
     
  10. DereksDontRun

    Hitman

    Joined: Oct 23, 2013

    Posts: 657

    tbh, I'd avoid mtb gloves. Yes, I've used some light-weight (non waterproof) snow gloves (listed as pipe gloves) for mtb in the winter, but you want something 100% waterproof, which I've not really had out of mtb gloves. (but, I've never needed waterproof when biking as I'm happy with wet hands, so I've just not tried any)

    why is waterproof so key? when learning you'll be falling over and then picking yourself back up (certainly if you try boarding). if you've not got waterproof gloves you hands are going to get cold v v quickly, and then the gloves will be minging to put on the following day(s)
     
  11. Syla5

    Mobster

    Joined: Feb 13, 2012

    Posts: 4,790

    You should consider a packaged bank account, Nationwide do one for £13 a month, world wide travel insurance covering winter sports and extends to family, breakdown cover, mobile phone insurance.
     
  12. D.P.

    Caporegime

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 29,325

    Leather work gloves with fur lining is the best (the traditional sheepskin style), wax the leather outer. They aren't 100% waterproof but work well, and wool stay warms even when wet.
    The leather outer will last a long time. The problem with all ski gloves is they get destroyed in no time; sharp ski edges, rope toes, holding poles, sliding falls.

    Gloves are actually quite tricky to get right. You want some degree of waterpoofness but they also need to be breathable because if you sweat then you can get very cold hands later. Even with goretex liners you struggle to get gloves that are both waterproof and breathable enough. You then have the issue that when it gets cold out, your hands can really nose dive in temperatures and your body starts diverting blood. Your hands are very exposed when skiing so you have to factor the windchill. But of course gloves that are too thick and you will get too hot and sweat away which can exasperate the situation later.

    I don't think you can really have 1 glove for all conditions, even on the same day it makes sense to be prepared.
    I have dozens of different gloves but for a ski holiday I would pack:
    1 standard pair for every day use.
    1 thinner pair for milder days, for use as a backup, or for apres ski. Typically in backpack if it starts cold but warms up a lot in the day, potentially swapping back in the later afternoon when it gets cold.
    1 pair glove liners, carried in backpack. If you start to get too cold then these help a lot. You can take you hand out of the thick glove to gain dexterity but protect form worst of wind/cold.
    1 Pair down mittens with goretex down shell. If it gets really cold then this is the only way to go. When really cold can add the liner gloves.


    I've been skiing over 25 years, sometimes over 70-80 days a season (before family...). Getting gloves right is still not exactly simple. There are vastly different temperatures between 1pm in the sun at resort level vs 9am/4pm at 3200m on a shady north face powder slopes with a strong wind. No single pair of gloves will cover those scenarios.
     
  13. Somnambulist

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jun 17, 2010

    Posts: 9,303

    Location: London

    The plan was to get some merino liner gloves (I had some Icebreaker ones already but they've developed holes in the fingers so had to bin) then something a bit substantial (but not huge) to go over them. There's so much choice and price ranges it's got me stumped! The expected conditions according to the internet:

     
  14. Somnambulist

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jun 17, 2010

    Posts: 9,303

    Location: London

    Something like these? Your 10% code worked as well. Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2018
  15. D.P.

    Caporegime

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 29,325

    Took a day off work to ski verbier before the crowds come. Good piste conditions but off-piste is thin, highly variable snow and not really worth it. Provably wont go back until March as verbier in high season is just awful.
     
  16. The Craig

    Soldato

    Joined: May 4, 2007

    Posts: 7,450

    Location: Warwickshire

    I think if youre just going bansko snowboarding anything should be fine. Went there snowboarding for my first holiday about 4 years ago.

    I used a 20 quid pair of thick gloves from amazon in bansko, but can recommend some goretex ones (mine are dakine, Mrs got berghaus). Sportspursuit.com has some good offers on all kit, think mine were about £40.

    I highly recommend buying some coccyx protection/padded shorts and also having lessons beforehand (it will improve your enjoyment 100%).

    As long as your bag isn't too heavy should be OK boarding. I used one as a beginner with Dslr and water etc and was OK. If you can get a waist/chest attachment that's useful.

    Sadly I'm not going snowboarding this year/season!
     
  17. Amp34

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jul 25, 2005

    Posts: 28,441

    Location: Canada

    On a related note this time of year is the busiest for ski hills. The slopes this weekend were crowded and the almost every injury I encountered involved a collision, a snowboarder trashing a skier from behind.

    That said I don’t think it’s necessarily an issue with snowboarders/boarding in general, just an unfortunate number of a certain type of person attracted to boarding. The sort of person that goes too fast for the conditions/locations, spending too much time listening to their music rather than paying attention to those around them. Not that some skiers are any better mind you, it just seems there’s less of then and/or they have more manouverability, so don’t cause as many incidents.

    Either way, moral of the story is don’t be a **** and slow down when it’s busy/crowded, and ski to your abilities/snow conditions. :p
     
  18. DereksDontRun

    Hitman

    Joined: Oct 23, 2013

    Posts: 657

    it's always silly at the start of each season - people are giddy to be back on snow plus they're trying to ride/ski to the quality/ability that they were at the end of the last season, even though they've just had 7+ months away from snow and are probably lacking fitness
     
  19. izzop

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jul 7, 2009

    Posts: 2,210

    Location: Wiltshire

    Ended up booking a week in Saalbach, 2nd week in March, very much looking forward to it as I've been wanting to go for sometime.

    Before that however I've got a fortnight in the Dolomites to look forward to, roll on the 26th Jan! :)
     
  20. Amp34

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jul 25, 2005

    Posts: 28,441

    Location: Canada

    The seasons almost two months old here (started at the beginning of november).

    The issue is the slopes are busy with a lot of beginners at this time of year (Christmas/New year break). Unfortunately that mean many regulars are skiing/boarding like the slopes are empty and not adjusting for the crowds.

    There’s a consistent problem with people going too fast all year round, it just gets exacerbated at certain times of year. Its one of the reasons there’s slow signage in beginner areas, not that anyone pays attention...! We also have patrollers stationed at crunch points for this very reason. Standing and waving usually slows most people down.