Well I fell down the custom keyboard world.

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Choose your layout first. I find 96% keyboards take a lot of getting used to as there's no key spacing to help your fingers find their way around.

Not tried a K series, but I do have a TH80Pro. Lovely keyboard.
 
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I was working with Epomaker on getting some more stability in the RT100 mini screen (ie making it actually work as intended) and during this testing they sent me an Ansi firmware instead of ISO which made the keyboard basically impossible to use (enter became # for example). They agreed to take it back and replace it so I sent it off to them and provided proof of posting (for refund) via a fully tracked service. After 2 days it hadnt moved from the sorting depot so I opened a claim with Royal Mail and now after almost a month they have sent me a cheque to cover what I paid for it, but annoyingly I got it on Black Friday in the sale and so it was only £70 cost rather than the £110 or so it is now, so its not getting replaced as whilst it was a decent keyboard for £70 (even with its quirks, which were really just the add on screen) I am more than happy with my V3 and am not willing to pay more for a replacement of the RT100.
 
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Got a couple of builds done/part done.

JRIS75 was a fiddly nightmare, not much fun to build at all.

The Mode Envoy on the other hand was a dream, really enjoyable experience. Would recommend.
 
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I'm VERY interested in the new Mode65 that's being released soon, looks great.

I also like the look of the Loop but can't justify it at the moment.
 
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Has anyone else used a Wooting keyboard and struggled to then go back to a regular mechanical keyboard? I picked up the Wooting module a few months ago and put it into a Tofu case and for gaming it's been incredible. The 'rapid trigger' on the key press is brilliant and the light feel to each key press works so well for the types of FPS games I play.

The downside is that each time I go back to a 'regular' mechanical keyboard it takes me way longer to adjust than previously.

I used to swap between my 60% gummy o-ring mounted board for gaming (with black inks) to a 65% novelkey cream board for work (typing experience on this is really lovely, just the right amount of pressure required) - but now I'm finding I have this adjustment period with both. The Wooting is ok for work/general typing - but the key presses are almost too light for typing (even with the typing profile assigned, it won't adjust the feel of travel).

I don't want to stop using the Wooting, it's honestly incredible for gaming - but I'm wondering if I should look at potentially a lighter tacticle switch to put in the 65% board.
 
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Has anyone else used a Wooting keyboard and struggled to then go back to a regular mechanical keyboard? I picked up the Wooting module a few months ago and put it into a Tofu case and for gaming it's been incredible. The 'rapid trigger' on the key press is brilliant and the light feel to each key press works so well for the types of FPS games I play.

The downside is that each time I go back to a 'regular' mechanical keyboard it takes me way longer to adjust than previously.

I used to swap between my 60% gummy o-ring mounted board for gaming (with black inks) to a 65% novelkey cream board for work (typing experience on this is really lovely, just the right amount of pressure required) - but now I'm finding I have this adjustment period with both. The Wooting is ok for work/general typing - but the key presses are almost too light for typing (even with the typing profile assigned, it won't adjust the feel of travel).

I don't want to stop using the Wooting, it's honestly incredible for gaming - but I'm wondering if I should look at potentially a lighter tacticle switch to put in the 65% board.
Never used a Wooting myself but there's no harm in trying some new switches.
 
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I recently got a Keychron K10. I liked that I could plug it in to the PC (switching to Windows layout with a physical switch) and also run it as Bluetooth to my MacBook Air when I was running on a second display, switching to a Mac layout.

I'm not sure if I'm just some kind of luddite, but I just don't get it. I don't see the appeal of a mech keyboard. It feels too light to the touch, and it feels like needless noise. Am I just a person who prefers a membrane keyboard after years and years spent on office PCs?
Going back to my luddite view, it seems most of the noise out of the keyboard is the keys hitting the bottom and then another noise as they spring back and hit the top of the travel. The switch itself is linear and very, very quiet if I take a key and slowly it move it through all the travel. Is this pretty normal on a mech keyboard?

I love the look of a NuPhy Air96 V2, but I want it to match the quietness of my Apple Magic Keyboard :D
 
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Going back to my luddite view, it seems most of the noise out of the keyboard is the keys hitting the bottom and then another noise as they spring back and hit the top of the travel. The switch itself is linear and very, very quiet if I take a key and slowly it move it through all the travel. Is this pretty normal on a mech keyboard?

I love the look of a NuPhy Air96 V2, but I want it to match the quietness of my Apple Magic Keyboard :D
Yes- top out and bottom out are the two events that create almost all of the sound. If you want a silent mech keyboard, there are plenty of silent switches to support that. Alternatively you can install O-rings with most keycaps as long as they don't have too high a profile. That'll eliminate most of the bottom out sound.
 
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Yes- top out and bottom out are the two events that create almost all of the sound. If you want a silent mech keyboard, there are plenty of silent switches to support that. Alternatively you can install O-rings with most keycaps as long as they don't have too high a profile. That'll eliminate most of the bottom out sound.
I'm really starting to think I'm too much of a grinch to have a mech keyboard :D I'd expect the keyboard to come with O-rings if the manufacturer knew it was noisy. I don't why anyone would think this level of noise is acceptable. My partner has commented a few times on how loud it is.
 
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I'm really starting to think I'm too much of a grinch to have a mech keyboard :D I'd expect the keyboard to come with O-rings if the manufacturer knew it was noisy. I don't why anyone would think this level of noise is acceptable. My partner has commented a few times on how loud it is.
Most enthusiasts aren't interested in the out-of-the-box experience, and having to obtain parts and experiment is the whole point of the exercise. Sound is a large part of that- I have 10 keyboards that all have different sounds and feel, but none of them are silent.

If the sound isn't acceptable for you, modify it. If you don't want to modify it, then I think you're right, they're not for you. And there's nothing wrong with preferring membrane keyboards.
 
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