What Linux Operating Systems do you like?

Soldato
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Been using Alma as a replacement for CentOS, shame what happened to CentOS, still mainly RedHat for prod linux servers, although RH9 has some fun quirks, luckily still only testing, fun times.
 
Associate
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manjaro kde desktop, ubuntu and debian server versions
tried a number of distros inc mxlinux, fedora, debian. But the above give me the mix of software i like to use, manajro / arch AUR is amazing and so many options compared to other distros.
 
Soldato
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Been using Alma as a replacement for CentOS, shame what happened to CentOS, still mainly RedHat for prod linux servers, although RH9 has some fun quirks, luckily still only testing, fun times.

We're going with Rocky for all of our servers, many thousands of CentOS7 boxes to migrate, dreading it lol.
 
Soldato
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We're going with Rocky for all of our servers, many thousands of CentOS7 boxes to migrate, dreading it lol.
I'd be interested in the reasoning for picking Rocky over Alma, if you can/will share?
Been using Nobara Linux for the past couple months on my gaming laptop. Working great so far and has given me better FPS than PopOS
<3 Fedora. Nobara is nicely polished if you don't want to mess about setting it up for yourself. I've played with the last two versions.
 
Soldato
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I'd be interested in the reasoning for picking Rocky over Alma, if you can/will share?

<3 Fedora. Nobara is nicely polished if you don't want to mess about setting it up for yourself. I've played with the last two versions.
I was using PopOS previously. Nobara is doing a much better job at keeping my CPU pegged for games like CSGO. I saw over 80fps improvement.
 
Soldato
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I'd be interested in the reasoning for picking Rocky over Alma, if you can/will share?

I don't think Alma was even looked at in all honesty - this is the first time I'm hearing about it - I'm not a dedicated Linux engineer, I deal with Virtualization/Storage etc primarily. I know there was an issue with CentOS Stream and our Openstack at one point. The decision was made primarily due to that, and made at an architectural level. I won't go into specific detail as I'm not 100% sure I'd be allowed to. I suspect Alma would be fine, but a product was chosen and they're part way through it.
 
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I started out on Mandrake Linux back in 03 or something around there, and went on to Debian then Gentoo. I remember printing out the entire manual to install it and spent days compiling stuff to get a working system. Good fun.

These days I continually go back to Arch. There are many good distros I've tried recently. Tumbleweed, MX Linux and so on, but Arch is what I'm used to using. I use Debian on my server though.
 

mct

mct

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I started out on Mandrake Linux back in 03 or something around there, and went on to Debian then Gentoo. I remember printing out the entire manual to install it and spent days compiling stuff to get a working system. Good fun.

These days I continually go back to Arch. There are many good distros I've tried recently. Tumbleweed, MX Linux and so on, but Arch is what I'm used to using. I use Debian on my server though.
That is when I starred using Linux. Think it was Mandrake 8, then I purchased a boxed version of Mandrake 9, wish I knew where it disappeared to.

Spent ages trying to get my USB Broadband
modem connected and also my NVidia graphics card. I succeeded in the end. When I went back to the machine the next day, I was back at square one again.

These days I generally go back to Ubuntu Mate, Kubuntu.

If I ever use Windows to help friends and family out, I find it frustrating. A few months back I helped a family member remove a salad theme that had attached itself to the search box in the taskbar. He doesn't know how it got there.
 
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I don't think Alma was even looked at in all honesty - this is the first time I'm hearing about it - I'm not a dedicated Linux engineer, I deal with Virtualization/Storage etc primarily. I know there was an issue with CentOS Stream and our Openstack at one point. The decision was made primarily due to that, and made at an architectural level. I won't go into specific detail as I'm not 100% sure I'd be allowed to. I suspect Alma would be fine, but a product was chosen and they're part way through it.
Why would you go with either now with the stuff Red hat is pulling. Why would you not just install Debian onto everything? i moved everything over when they pulled the cento8 bs and its been easier on my life.
 
Soldato
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Why would you go with either now with the stuff Red hat is pulling. Why would you not just install Debian onto everything? i moved everything over when they pulled the cento8 bs and its been easier on my life.

It was quite before RedHats latest egregious issues, and we are indeed after the latest offering Debian now. But as I said earlier it wasn't even remotely my decision. I prefer Debian and have done for years.
 
Soldato
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Why would you go with either now with the stuff Red hat is pulling. Why would you not just install Debian onto everything? i moved everything over when they pulled the cento8 bs and its been easier on my life.
It was quite before RedHats latest egregious issues, and we are indeed after the latest offering Debian now. But as I said earlier it wasn't even remotely my decision. I prefer Debian and have done for years.
I can understand for something development, or the odd server in SMB, but for proper production use I'm always surprised Debian gets a look in. The project is great, don't get me wrong, but the security team is small and there's no SLA or commercial support. Nobody ever seems to think of SUSE - older than RHEL, solid, great folks, and an attractive commercial support contract. Oracle, likewise, seem to be sucking up some (unusual) PR wins here.

More broadly in spirit of the OP, I've been enjoying Alpine lately. It's as small as 50 MB, useful out of the box, runs Docker seamlessly, and for a quick test server you're up and running in a couple of minutes. Tiny base, tiny attack surface, light, and responsive on even absolutely ancient hardware. As a bonus, no systemd. :D
 
Soldato
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I can understand for something development, or the odd server in SMB, but for proper production use I'm always surprised Debian gets a look in. The project is great, don't get me wrong, but the security team is small and there's no SLA or commercial support. Nobody ever seems to think of SUSE - older than RHEL, solid, great folks, and an attractive commercial support contract. Oracle, likewise, seem to be sucking up some (unusual) PR wins here.

I can't answer for other places, but for us Linux support isn't an issue as such, we don't on the whole run into issues with the OS, and we seldom spent time troubleshooting things that RHEL/SUSE/Oracle would assist us with, we'd just build new, and it's all IaC now, and super redundant. Security is a good question as Debian goes for stability, but we have a large security team to deal with that :D

Plus cost, if we went to the higher ups and said oh that OS we've got thousands of VMs deployed with that's been free, we now need to add support on to it for realistically minimal benefits we'd probably be executed.
 

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Got hundreds of boxes, if something breaks i just delete it and deploy again.

Where we are required to have support for contract reasons we have some ubuntu. I have tried suse and didnt like it much.
 
Soldato
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I am a bit of a hoarder and so I have oads of distros.

I have been a massive SABAYON fan until v15 and then the ONLY version that worked after that was 18.3 and then it moved to KALI and thats been as unreliable for me as anything.

I love KDE 4 but I despise everythign about this PLASMA cartoon-visuals rubbish. Windows has done that too... I like fancy "GLASSY" icons not boring ones, and so KDE is no longer a distro that I will go for, I moved to Gnome, and after a whilee, I loved it, but then they changed that to Unity crap, and so I went to MATE and now I am more of a Cinnamon lover. I am still ok with MATE.

So, based on those, my main distros are MINT Cinnamon on my main Tux PC and currently Ubuntu Remix ( Cinnamon ) on my Test Linux PC.

I first started on RPM with Mandrake and I loved that, but stopped when Mandrake and Connectiva merged for Mandriva.

I started to like RedHat but then Fedora seemed to be funky for me.

For what its worth, I have Peppermint on my Linux Laptop and thats rock solid.
 
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Fedora for security for my use case.

Liked Manjaro as a rolling but would break with updates for me and I lack the knowledge to fix it quick enough to be worth it for me.

Will check out Nobara, thanks.

Would like to go for something rolling (for security updates and not losing config when clean-install uodating) BUT more stable than whatever I was doing to break Manjaro, perhaps Debian Testing?
 
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At the moment I'm running Debian (stable) on my desktop, PostMarketOS on my phone and Ubuntu Server (LTS) on my servers. I'm ready to ditch Ubuntu but I'm not sure what to switch to. I'm not particularly wedded to any package manager or anything. It's just lack of time that's stopped me moving on.
 
Soldato
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Fedora for security for my use case.

Liked Manjaro as a rolling but would break with updates for me and I lack the knowledge to fix it quick enough to be worth it for me.

Will check out Nobara, thanks.

Would like to go for something rolling (for security updates and not losing config when clean-install uodating) BUT more stable than whatever I was doing to break Manjaro, perhaps Debian Testing?
I highly recommend OpenSUSE Tumbleweed (NOT OpenSUSE Leap). It is the best rolling release distro I have used.
 
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