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When are you going fully electric?

Discussion in 'Motors' started by Ricochet J, Aug 23, 2018.

  1. Rroff

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 13, 2006

    Posts: 67,937

    As above they probably don't have to worry about actually hitting it and/or hope it will have been forgotten by then and if not massage the circumstances with some BS figures/regulations. It is what the Conservatives do. Meanwhile it is a nice soundbite for them.
     
  2. Firestar_3x

    Caporegime

    Joined: Mar 11, 2005

    Posts: 29,976

    Location: Leafy Cheshire

    Interesting policy change, i wonder when they plan on banning people driving existing petrol and diesel cars?
     
  3. Bug One

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 10,036

    Location: Sandwich, Kent

    In a way, 2035 seems a long way off. However on the other hand, my previous car was a 2003.

    A lot is going to have to change, in infrastructure, the manufacturers and people mindsets to achieve that target.
     
  4. Hagar

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Mar 1, 2010

    Posts: 8,059

    Location: Prev. Nkata Cheshire

    I can see that well before that date cities will ban vehicles based on the fuel they use. So even in 2030 you would have to seriously plan journeys to avoid them or use public transport which will need to improve massively.
     
  5. Conscript

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Oct 18, 2004

    Posts: 9,359

    Location: Kent

    I hope, never.

    Whilst they aren't currently practical for me, I'm no Luddite, and love the idea of electric cars. I can see that they hold enormous advantages for some, and I can see the appeal of owning one. That said - I am still a driving enthusiast who loves things about ICE cars as well. I recognise that they are polluting, but I hope we get to a stage whereby traditional petrol/diesel cars become so rare that their use isn't really deemed a problem in terms of pollution, and therefore there is no need to ban them entirely.

    Although granted, eventually there will come a point whereby getting hold of traditional fuel will be all but impossible - I can't see the switch from ICE to EV supporting infrastructures leaving much room for maintaining the storage and supply of petrol and diesel for long.
     
  6. Russinating

    Capodecina

    Joined: Dec 27, 2005

    Posts: 15,746

    Location: Bristol

    I've ordered an EV but I wouldn't want to see ICEs banned outright. The pollution is primarily an issue in cities where it's fairly straightforward to ban ICE's during certain times of day, or pay a hefty fee for special cases (we used a 1971 Mini in a film shoot the other day for example). I imagine most motorways will be smart by then too so it wouldn't be too difficult to levy a toll on ICEs for their use there.

    Similarly to smoking, you only need to make a few changes where it matters most (indoors) to reduce smoking in general because it becomes difficult, inconvenient and against the social-norm. I can imagine friends and family frowing on someone still running an old ICE, unless it's a classic/for a good reason etc.
     
  7. Bug One

    Capodecina

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 10,036

    Location: Sandwich, Kent

    I expect what we'll see is a gradual move where traditional fuel stations transition from rows of petrol pumps, to rows of super fast chargers - as demand for them grows. Eventually ending up with a single petrol / diesel pump left in a forecourt full of chargers.
     
  8. Conscript

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Oct 18, 2004

    Posts: 9,359

    Location: Kent

    Indeed, but even then, that might eventually disappear. Even a single fuel pump will still need an underground storage tank (two, for petrol and diesel), and regular deliveries from large tankers. Hopefully demand from people like me will rmeain high enough to make it worthwhile, but how long before forecourt owners just decide that it's easier just to supply EV chargers only.
     
  9. Usher

    Mobster

    Joined: Dec 30, 2004

    Posts: 3,218

    Nobody can predict how small batteries may become, small enough to be like a large cassette that is slotted in and exchanged at a drive in terminal for a fully charged one and your on your way in a few minutes
     
  10. Firestar_3x

    Caporegime

    Joined: Mar 11, 2005

    Posts: 29,976

    Location: Leafy Cheshire

    Hopefully solid state hydrogen will take off.
     
  11. Rroff

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Oct 13, 2006

    Posts: 67,937

    Battery tech seems to have largely stagnated and hit brick walls - we could really do with a big breakthrough.
     
  12. Nasher

    Capodecina

    Joined: Nov 22, 2006

    Posts: 16,159

    It will be a very long time before petrol and diesel vanish. You can even still buy lead additives for old petrol cars, how long ago was leaded fuel banned?
     
  13. EddScott

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 8,220

    Location: Pembrokeshire

    This move to electric does make me wonder how long it will be before my daily becomes a hybrid or full electric.

    I do worry how long fuel will be available for. I'll have a classic car that is also part investment so how will that effect the value of said car if I can't actually use it?
     
  14. Rilot

    Don

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 20,060

    Location: Wargrave, UK

    I don't think 2035 is that ambitions to be honest. There are tons of new EVs coming over the next 24 months and all of the major manufacturers have committed to EV production (except Mazda I believe). We're talking 15 years.
    The only question is whether battery production can keep pace with demand.
     
  15. Uther

    Capodecina

    Joined: Jun 16, 2005

    Posts: 11,868

    We've just ordered a new diesel planet killer, which we will keep for 3 years or so. I suspect that may well be our last ICE vehicle. Some countries have a target of 2030 I believe for the ban on new ICE vehicles...
     
  16. Conscript

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Oct 18, 2004

    Posts: 9,359

    Location: Kent

    Isn't it more of a question of infrastructure? For many, owning an EV is still not a practical proposition. For those who make frequent long range trips, or who don't have off-street parking at home, then reliable access to public charging stations is imperative. It might well be easy to get everyone into an electric vehicle in a few years, but I imagine building the infrastructure to support them will take much longer.
     
  17. Praz94

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 28, 2018

    Posts: 1,249

    Location: London

    Im a car lover, I love petrol and the sound of engines and exhausts so id put off getting an electric car for as long as possible.

    However I have no issue with getting rid of most if not all diesel vehicles and replace them with electric. Vehicles such as lorries and buses I think the sooner they go electric the better, but personally I still want petrol vehicles around.

    Not sure why they can't introduce a rule to get rid of all diesel vehicles and keep petrol ones around?
     
  18. Rilot

    Don

    Joined: Oct 18, 2002

    Posts: 20,060

    Location: Wargrave, UK

    I don't think so. At the moment there isn't so much demand for public charging. As EVs become more and more mainstream I can see petrol stations switching over to charging stations.
     
  19. b0rn2sk8

    Soldato

    Joined: Mar 9, 2003

    Posts: 5,426

    The current utilisation for EV infrastructure is in the single digit percentage. Sure there are pockets of high utilisation but they are few and far between. Likewise there are some deserts where there really aren’t any.

    All it has to do is keep pace with demand, I’d go as far as saying it’s ahead of demand currently.

    Teslas European roadmap looks impressive and new sites are popping up on zap map every day.
     
  20. Nasher

    Capodecina

    Joined: Nov 22, 2006

    Posts: 16,159

    Pretty much the only EVs using the public chargers near me are taxi drivers. Some have bought EVs. But most of the time they are empty. You can count on one hand the number of EVs locally.