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Do you ever replace your aio?

Discussion in 'CPUs' started by skiersteve123, May 30, 2020.

  1. Acme

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jul 29, 2011

    Posts: 32,468

    Location: Acme's chair

    I assume he means because you can refill them.

    Which is why I bought my Rajintek Orcus.

    Its refillable and cheap as chips on OcUK...
     
  2. lnoton

    Mobster

    Joined: Apr 14, 2009

    Posts: 3,687

    Location: Cheshire

    Oh wow. Just read this last page or so.

    PC-guy is a riot.
     
  3. NightSt@lk3r

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Dec 7, 2005

    Posts: 7,561

    Location: Wiltshire

    Still using a first gen Corsair H100i that i've had since 2013, its not skipped a beat.
     
  4. jigger

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 28, 2007

    Posts: 12,638

    Those are non Arsetech patent ones.
     
  5. jigger

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 28, 2007

    Posts: 12,638

    Not just that. They are custom mini loops.
     
  6. Acme

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jul 29, 2011

    Posts: 32,468

    Location: Acme's chair

    The Fractal looks exactly like any other AIO, the cheapy Rajintek one I bought has a seperate in-line pump which isn't built into the block, and a fill port on the block. It was £59 I think. Super value.
     
  7. jigger

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 28, 2007

    Posts: 12,638

    Fractal make two types of AIO, Kelvin and Celsius. You’re probably looking at the Celsius.
     
  8. Acme

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jul 29, 2011

    Posts: 32,468

    Location: Acme's chair

    No I'm looking at the Kelvin. I guess the fittings can be undone and other stuff added in? But that seems to be all that sets it apart. Seems more like a gimmick tbh. I wouldn't want to run a full loop off the tiny little inbuilt pump, with no reservoir etc.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The other one you mentioned is very obviously different to the typical AIO.
     
  9. Grim5

    Mobster

    Joined: Feb 6, 2019

    Posts: 3,632

    Most AIO's are using Asetek's patent to make them.

    The only other option to avoid the patent trolling is to move the pump away from the block, like some do - I think EKWB does this on theirs
     
  10. Acme

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jul 29, 2011

    Posts: 32,468

    Location: Acme's chair

    And my Rajintek one does too. Has a ying yang spinny thang in the block instead acting as a "flow indicator". :p
     
  11. Psycho Sonny

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jun 21, 2006

    Posts: 33,391

    AIO are a waste of money.

    I buy the best value for money air cooler for £25-£35 and it will last several pcs you can always change the fan with each pc if you want.

    Cooler master Hyper 212
    Cryorig H5/H7
    ALPENFOHN BROCKEN 2

    I've used them in my last few builds and they were all very good and very quiet too. It's amazing the cooling offered by a £25 air cooler.
     
  12. Grim5

    Mobster

    Joined: Feb 6, 2019

    Posts: 3,632

    If that's your performance floor then you're wasting money already you should use the cooler in the box that comes with the cpu
     
  13. Psycho Sonny

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jun 21, 2006

    Posts: 33,391

    Last edited: Jul 3, 2020
  14. Psycho Sonny

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jun 21, 2006

    Posts: 33,391

    Hardware canucks also did one

    https://youtu.be/51hQUYp40nU

    Air cooler won.

    "Here's the problem with EVERY review of AIOs, as well as EVERY comparison of AIOs vs traditional fans: They NEVER allow enough time to show the TRUE temperature levels. At least this video allowed the systems to be running for 15 minutes before running the temperature readings, as most people reviewing/comparing AIOs tend to take temp readings within the first 5 minutes. However, even 15 minutes, as shown in this video, is NOT enough time for the honest nature of AIOs to appear. If you were to talk with any of the engineers designing AIO systems, you would find out that, at MINIMUM, you need to allow AT LEAST 30 minutes of run-time after booting up your system...and, for the most accurate results, allow the system a full hour (60 minutes). The reason is simple - just as liquids tend to hold cold longer than metals, they also hold heat longer. When you initially boot up your system, the liquid is at its lowest temp, thus immediate readings would give the false impression that your system is running considerably cooler. As time goes on, even though the liquid is taking heat away from the CPU, its overall temp is gradually increasing, until the point it reaches its maximum ability to remove heat. Looking at the radiator (the true cooling source), while it does lower the temp of the liquid, it can only lower it so much in the time the liquid is traveling through the radiator. For this reason, larger/longer radiators are going to produce far better results than smaller/square radiators. Unfortunately…and the problem with ALL AIOs…is the small size (thus, small throughput) of the pumps, combined with the fact that AIOs don’t have a reservoir. Small, low-powered pumps, such as those used in AIOs, can’t push through liquid fast enough, which is why smaller diameter hoses are used, so as to increase the flow speed. In theory, one would think this would help. However, due to the lower amount of liquid, it (somewhat) fails. This is where a reservoir would be extremely helpful, as it would allow cooled liquid to cool even further before returning towards the CPU. The lack of a reservoir means that partially-cooled liquid returns to the CPU, thus its cooling ability is lowered. There was a time I was on-board with AIOs…until I realized the truth. Do AIOs work? Of course they do. Do they have the ability to outperform fans? In many cases, yes…except where high-performance fans, such as higher-end units from Noctua & other companies come into play. The bottom line is, if you have the money to afford a high-quality, high-end custom liquid-cooling solution, then great...go for it, as it WILL be your best cooling solution. However, if you can’t afford a custom liquid-cooling solution, and are looking into AIOs, forget about them…high-quality fans, such as those manufactured by Noctua, are going to be your best choice...PERIOD!!!"

    some good comments too

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23vjWtUpItk

    linus video proving AIO's are a waste of time and money
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2020
  15. Acme

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jul 29, 2011

    Posts: 32,468

    Location: Acme's chair

    Every review I've ever read puts a 240mm AIO above even the gargantuan triple radiator air coolers.

    They are also much easier to install and you have no worries about RAM or chipset heatsink clearance.
     
  16. Relentless81

    Capodecina

    Joined: May 18, 2010

    Posts: 10,662

    That's not 100% true

    The Noctua D15S and Sythe Fuma to name two large air coolers don't interfere with RAM

    In my case which is ATX I can't fit an AIO in the ceiling because of my RAM and I cant fit some AIOs in the front because of my GPU but I can fit all of the large air coolers without a problem

    I would like to try an AIO but my choice is limited
     
  17. Psycho Sonny

    Caporegime

    Joined: Jun 21, 2006

    Posts: 33,391

    Well you cannot be reading many reviews as I just linked to 2 of the biggest you tubers and both of them agree that they aren't that good in those videos I linked to.

    It's why I stick with cheap air coolers. £25 job done.

    I get a cool running cpu. It's quiet due to large fan pushing loads of air at low rpm and it's easy to install with no maintainance and will last forever.

    Sure I could probably run stock but these things offer amazing cooling for £25. In one of the reviews above its only 5c hotter than the best solution however that solution is significantly louder.

    They also state a lot of reviewers don't stress test for at least 15 mins before conducting their tests.

    So aio will beat an air cooler every day in those scenarios. But after your pc has been under load for 20 mins the water has heated up and no longer offers as good cooling.

    Also I can then take the £75-£130 savings over an AIO and buy a better gpu with a better cooler on it. That way it helps my cpu stay cooler and install additional fans into the chassis too.

    My pcs have never had any issues with cpus overheating or fans getting loud.

    If I had money to waste though I'd get one as they look cool. However they are very poor value for money.
     
  18. SonicSW20

    Hitman

    Joined: Apr 1, 2019

    Posts: 833

    Correct. I had one previously, it worked very well. I was looking at expanding it but never bothered in the end, but Fractal support told me that as long as you run the pump at 12V, the system can handle processor and GPU with no issues.

    TBH the best advantage is the ease of service and customisation if you wanted to go that route, as its all standard fitting you could change the hoses out etc if you wanted.
     
  19. Ross Thomson

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Nov 7, 2017

    Posts: 1,140

    they used a ****** 240 aio though.

    gamers nexus test time to steady state.

    evga 360mm 6mins
    arctic 380 5.18 mins
    X72 4.9 mins
    X62 4.3mins
    D15 1.48 mins


    AIO's don't take long to heat up.

    noctua fans make such an annoying noise and cost a fortune. The arctic 280 is quieter and cooler than a D15 and was about the same price on release.

    Given the results from AIO's the fluid flow doesn't seem to be holding them back.

    Reservoir size only matters for getting the liquid to steady state, it does not affect final temps

    Who actually pays attention to Linus - you'll be quoting Jay next.
     
  20. Grim5

    Mobster

    Joined: Feb 6, 2019

    Posts: 3,632

    Yep, Linus and jay aren't the most technicality competent reviewers, especially Linus. Some Linus reviews are like something so expect to see on the Verge and Jay two cents spent a fair bit of time earlier this year trying to convince his audience that They should under lock their amd cpu because amd is wrong and have the voltage too high at stock