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*** The 2014 Gym Rats Thread ***

Discussion in 'Sports Arena' started by mrthingyx, Jan 1, 2014.

  1. tom_e

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Dec 26, 2003

    Posts: 26,378

    Location: West mids

    I get through the best part of 2 liters even when our air con is working!
     
  2. slambo69

    Mobster

    Joined: Feb 28, 2006

    Posts: 3,816

    Location: Aberdeen

    I have seated overhead press as part of my routine, but my friend has been having shoulder issues and recently his physio told him that exercises like that and military press are un-natural. The body isn't design to lift heavy weight above your head. Seems to be a lot of conflicting information when I googled this, does anyone here have any thoughts?
     
  3. Somnambulist

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Jun 17, 2010

    Posts: 9,538

    Location: London

    [​IMG]
     
  4. mrthingyx

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Apr 3, 2003

    Posts: 15,183

    Location: Cambridge

    The person in that picture is a machine. And therefore not natural. :D

    As Somnambulist is suggesting, the body is perfectly adapted to lift heavy stuff above the head. It just takes a physio with half a brain to realise this. I'm not a physio, but having a physio that lifts is a very helpful resource for this sort of thing. There are paradigms in physiotherapy just like every other profession, meaning some are quite comfortable helping elderly people keep moving, and others who want to return athletes to competition after injury. You want the latter when you're injured. How can you tell? Ask them what they think of lifting weights. If they say it's bad, then run a mile.

    Your mate's problems are probably caused by poor technique caused by duff rotator cuff activation/strength, shoulder positioning (traps, lats, rhombs), tight pecs... the list is endless.

    Practically speaking, "behind the neck" strict pressing will stress the gleno-humeral joint far more than from the front because the angle created is very happy to cause its disarticulation (i.e. forcing the joint surfaces apart = very, very bad with any force at all applied). This is why pressing from front is much cooler.
     
  5. grudas

    Capodecina

    Joined: Mar 12, 2008

    Posts: 20,134

    Location: West sussex

    I'd ask physio if he even lifts? ;)
     
  6. Freefaller

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Jun 5, 2003

    Posts: 86,983

    Location: Falling...

    A Lot of physios don't really know what they're talking about when it comes to lifting weights.

    Lifting things over your head is a perfectly natural movement.

    I'd suggest that your friend is either using bad technique, has tight pecs and/or poor mobility in his shoulders forcing a poor plane of movement.
     
  7. XeNoN89

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Mar 6, 2007

    Posts: 7,788

    Location: SW19

    I mean 2 additional pints on top of all the water I drink while AT the gym.
     
  8. icecold

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Apr 6, 2007

    Posts: 7,632

    An alarming number of physios have a weak grasp of their own field, never mind lifting or how to become a functional beast.

    Tell him to find a new physio, and also that he has been neglecting his mobility/stretching and should stop being lax with self maintenance.
     
  9. slambo69

    Mobster

    Joined: Feb 28, 2006

    Posts: 3,816

    Location: Aberdeen

    Thanks for the input guys. Just starting to take preventative stuff like this seriously, as my aforementioned friend is getting shoulder issues and my older brother has rotator cuff issues. How many of you guys do light, preventative exercises?

    I usually use that big rubber band thing (thats the technical term...) to do side swipe motions, keeping my elbows tucked into my waist, some wall angels and cobra's before my workouts, but think some more on my off days would help.

    Do any of these sound good (pdf file)? : http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/PDFs/Rehab_Shoulder_5.pdf

    or is something as exhaustive as that for rehabilitation only?
     
  10. mrthingyx

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Apr 3, 2003

    Posts: 15,183

    Location: Cambridge

    Yes. I have had some rather interesting shoulder problems recently which my (very awesome) physio has helped correct. It's taken 4 months to completely address the issue, but I'm now there. A lot of the exercises I was given (and now use) are in that PDF, but you shouldn't just go and do a load of RC work without really understanding what you're trying to achieve and why/how.

    As one of my physios said, "practice makes imperfect; only perfect practice makes perfect." So you need to do the exercises correctly to ensure that triceps (for example) or deltoids don't get involved and compromise the movements prescroibed.
     
  11. slambo69

    Mobster

    Joined: Feb 28, 2006

    Posts: 3,816

    Location: Aberdeen

    Agreed, Im very cautious about form, took me months to even dare deadlift! Thanks for the advice.
     
  12. Dreamforger

    Hitman

    Joined: Nov 4, 2011

    Posts: 963

    Flopping like a fish onto a cricket ball on the floor, wedging it into the pec and anterior delt area seems to have solved my shoulder issue (I am yet to bench though). Kelly Starrett explains flopping like a fish a lot better than I can though. I'll pop this into the mobility thread too as I found this really helped a long with another video I found particularity useful.
     
  13. Scon

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Mar 27, 2010

    Posts: 1,841

    Hey guys I was a member of the facebook group for just less than a year I think and although I didn't post much I did really enjoy being in the group seeing what was going on. I was removed about a month ago but now that i've finished my summer work could i rejoin? I'll try post more often this time! :p
     
  14. mrthingyx

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Apr 3, 2003

    Posts: 15,183

    Location: Cambridge

    Of course you did. Has the wrist healed, I take it? ;)
     
  15. Scon

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Mar 27, 2010

    Posts: 1,841

    Yeah, dat RSI kicked in, had to take a break ;)
     
  16. Delvis

    Caporegime

    Joined: Nov 7, 2004

    Posts: 28,227

    Location: Buckinghamshire

    Just re request it.
     
  17. iamtheoneneo

    Sgarrista

    Joined: Mar 15, 2010

    Posts: 8,814

    Location: Bucks

    On the subject of OHP , I do enjoy it alot but its a health risk for me. The biggest issue is that I feel my back is curving to much and I will often then get lower back pains.
    The weight isnt really an issue more of a posture thing as my lower half doesnt like being so static and makes the top half way to ridged - if that makes any sense! I dunno Iv only recently got into them so maybe it will sort itself out but alot of heavy lifters seem to have that back curve when OHP but for me it gets me in a lot of bother.
     
  18. mrthingyx

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Apr 3, 2003

    Posts: 15,183

    Location: Cambridge

    This sounds like a core strength and form issue, not an OHP issue. :)
     
  19. JohnnyDrama

    Wise Guy

    Joined: Jan 22, 2008

    Posts: 1,245

    Location: Doncaster

    First attempt at a session in the gym following surgery a fortnight ago. 50kg bench was tough (Was doing 110kg in March) so I cheered myself up with some arm work. Did some stretching as I've not really moved in a few weeks and feel a lot better for that. Some bike on little resistance too.

    Going to take a long time getting back into the swing of things. Slow and steady wins the race though!
     
  20. icecold

    Man of Honour

    Joined: Apr 6, 2007

    Posts: 7,632

    Looking at people lifting more than you and assuming that they are doing it right is a dangerous thing.

    Some lean back is ok, but the spine should remain in neutral. If your spine position changes (does you rib cage rise relative to your hips?), then you need to use less weight to control the movement.